ENVIRONMENT IN THE PAST; WALLS IN THE PRESENT

 

What we can learn

BUILDING SURVEYS

Building surveys can provide many clues to the past. Archaeologists can determine change in space, material use, and date.  I plan on surveying the materials used: this includes measuring the size of the timbers, the style of joints, saw marks, and additional materials including stone, brick and plaster.

 

What can your building say?

CLUES ABOUT THE PAST

It is easy to take our home's past for granted; we think of it as something special to us.  But it has a past, sometimes a long one, where people worked and lived in a world unlike our own.  By looking at the clues of the building, pieces of this past can be unveiled.

In some of my past work, I identified pieces of stone that were used in North Lincolnshire.  Through looking at the patterns and decorations, I determined that villages had been reusing stone from the local abbey for centuries! One of the examples are in the picture above.

One of the most impressive uses of building survey was by Oliver Rackham.  By surveying all of the timbers, he linked the individual framing pieces to types of trees.  he could tell that the pieces came from a managed woodland; from there, he estimated how many acres of woodland were necessary to support one building in the past.  By looking at a house, people's past relationships with the landscape be revealed.

 

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